Airdrop program
Get from 15 SOL free and 10 SOL per referral
Get free SOL
Sola
beta
2 months

So here's a card I never thought I'd be making, here's a look into why there's racism toward First Nations at least in Alberta.

So recently my mother started combining for a friend, a nice guy, not an ass or a racist. This fellows father is in the same boat though we've seen less of him. So this morning when my mother was texting to see when she what time she was to be out there and what field, she is told that her bosses dad caught a native fellow red handed trying to steal from his shop. So instead of dealing with it himself, he took the proper channels and phones the police so they could arrest him. So at the end of it all, after getting caught red handed, the just let him go. So now let's go back, last winter a white dude was also caught stealing, got shot or shot at. He got charged. End of story. So now with this bullshit being the story you hear over and over and over, what is the pissed off farmers motive for taking the proper channels? This is Albert that this is happening which for those of you who don't know is 100% the Texas of Canada. In the rural areas everyone and their dog has a rifle. We're even borrowing a .303 british for a bear that's been hanging about our yard. So if a farmer can't protect his or her shit by simply catching the bugger in the act and phoning the cops what is the motivator for these older crotchety farmer to not just shoot the fucker and dump him elsewhere. Nobody has a second thought if they hear a gun out here, pests happen (skunks, coyotes, the occasional bear) so this crap happening makes me wonder how many of the First Nations that go missing are exactly that situation. Pissed off the wrong farmer that's had enough of their shit.

Now that all said, it's not as if everyone just assumes that every native is out to steal their crap. The school I went to had a First Nations fellow as the janitor/maintenance guy, I'm not sure I ever heard a bad word about him. We was polite, damn good at his job (the maintenance part in particular), and was good at seemingly every sport known to man. Even after he left for greener pastures and a few other dudes replaced him people still said that he was better. So it's not as if people are hating First Nations just to hate them. They repeatedly earn this hate by pulling this bullshit and always getting away with it, on top of getting free money because their predecessors where wronged, of which nobody denies, but how bloody long can this be milked?

16697votes
16.16SOL earned
Vote
Share
Vote
Share
33
1666
16697
Canada, Mannville
32 comments
thelevel
I'm just south of you. I grew up with a guy who's black feet and its definitely a different way if life than the other people I hung out with. But then if I go to Arizona, or oregon, they have "tribes". It could be tribes of wealthy, or hippies, or some race, or whatever. Kind of reminds me of how people have a particular state license plate and that means their a crazy driver. Hah
Infidel Castro
Everyone's predecessors have been wronged
10
thelevel
One of mine was a king, I bet he did more of the wrong doing haha
10
flack
Thanks for this insight into life where you are. i don’t really know enough to comment but it seems to me that the law has to apply evenly. Be that to rich white folk in California or First Nations in Alberta.
Nina One
Random Obsessions, I was hoping someone else would address this or your card would fade into obscurity, but apparently not. Far too many people are endorsing it for me to let this go. I know you’re a good man and I don’t want you to think I’m implying otherwise. But you are dead wrong here. First, you’re using single instances to judge how the law is being applied. Anecdotal evidence is just that: anecdotal, and subject to bias. Policing of First Nations people tends to be strongly in the other direction. For instance: https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/edmonton/street-checks-edmonton-police-aboriginal-black-carding-1.4178843 Far from being given a break, First Nations people are extremely overrepresented in prison. From Statistics Canada: “In 2015/2016, Aboriginal adults were overrepresented in admissions to provincial and territorial correctional services, as they accounted for 26% of admissions while representing about 3% of the Canadian adult population.” This article talks about some of the reasons why: https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2018/06/19/overrepresentation-of-indigenous-people-in-canadas-prisons-persists-amid-drop-in-overall-incarceration.html You talk about oppression of First Nations people as if it’s in the past, and refer to it being “milked.” This is really painful for me to read from you because it is so offensive. Please do some reading on the reality of life for First Nations people in Canada. Those articles should give you some idea. The legacy of colonialism and the impact of residential schools is in no way over. Trauma, displacement, suicide, substance abuse, all are still rampant in many First Nations communities. Racial prejudice continues, and it’s deadly. Many First Nations people have lost multiple friends and family members to murder or suicide. If you want to understand the legacy of residential schools, think of children taken from their families, raised by caretakers who forbade them their language and culture, abused them and treated them like inferiors. Those people went home unable to parent their own children. No childhood, no security, no safety, no self-esteem. And that got passed on. And that’s only one piece of the trauma First Nations have experienced. We owe reparations, and everything we can do to make First Nations healthy again. Destroying communities and cultures and then telling them to “get over it” is an expression of ignorance and white privilege. Please think again.
10
Random ObsessionsAuthor
We learned plenty of the schools back when throughout high school and yes they were horrid and cannot be defended in any way shape or form. The people who were affected by them rightly deserve compensation in one way or another. But in the younger generations that are living in reserves in northern Alberta it seems to be doing more harm than good in perpetuating a cycle of poverty leading to stealing and other crimes. Maybe milked is the wrong word but it's becoming rather apparent to the people that spend time in and around the reserves that throwing money at the problem is not helping anything.
Nina One
As for the younger generation, they’re impacted too. Their parents are badly damaged, so they are damaged.
Nina One
I understand your reactions. Damaged people don’t always behave well. Communities that have lost their central purpose and self-sufficiency tend to come adrift. But please don’t spread stereotypes and prejudices. Communities need to be self-sustaining. What do the reserves have that allows them to do that? Not much, I don’t think.
10
Random ObsessionsAuthor
Alrighty, sorry for not responding. I've been busy with a couple things. I had a conversation with another person so I'm going to paste the relevant portions here. With notes in square brackets for context and such. Be warned it's a bit of a book. "But yeah it's probably rather harsh[the card]. It's a difficult thing to talk about because anyone you talk to that actually lives or works around the reserves or whatever else, they often don't hate First Nations, they hate thieves and are annoyed that they get so much free money when it was the older generations that were wronged and deserve compensation. For example, my father was a carpenter by trade for a long time. He as well as other crews would build houses for reserves that needed them every now and again, just a regular job, nothing special. But time and time again you'd see the burnt remnants of a house one in front of the other. This is because sometimes after a house was built for these people they'd have a big huge party for this new house and then at the end of said party they'd burn it down. So the people that participate in these party's care so little for others and take so much for granted that they'd burn down a house that was built for them at no cost to them. So how do you thing this made the construction crew feel, you spend how many weeks building this thing knowing that within a week of finishing it will be all undone. Even while they were doing any construction around the reserves if they needed to leave for any amount of time they had to lock up and put away EVERYTHING because if they went across the street to get a coffee and come back three minutes later they'd have no tools left. Doesn't make for great relations. And the stories of this sort or disregard for everything just go on and on and on. Even emergency services can't help them properly because ambulances and fire trucks get raided [also plenty of personal experience from my father on this one as he was EMS after he stopped carpentry] and police get mobbed or shot at. But you'll never hear of any of this in the news of any sort, only that the local white population are discriminating against the First Nations folk. So people are called racist assholes all while they're getting stolen from and everything else."
Random ObsessionsAuthor
On why the financial aid likely isn't helping from what I can tell. "Honestly my only guess would be that it's a combo of lack of an education on how to get and hold a job/financial smarts which like you said results in stealing that then becomes ingrained over generations as people grow up in it [like how you said that those that had to suffer through the residential schools still having issues from them even now] combined with the government enabling it by paying them endlessly and seemingly never taking crime around the reserves seriously. Which thinking about it would also have the double affect of screwing over First Nations trying to break the cycle because they'd often be in the heart of all this crime and you can bet that as soon as they started doing well for themselves they'd be a target as well. A big damn positive feedback loop that's helped if unintentionally by the same funds that are supposed to break it."
Nina One
Random Obsessions, you’re right; that kind of behaviour won’t endear the First Nations communities to those around them. Those individuals may be in the minority, and they may be victimizing their own neighbors too. And many of their neighbors may be doing the right thing. But what stands out is dysfunction and crime. Money can sometimes make things worse. The problems are so complicated that there is no straightforward answer. Psychologically, I’d think that the best route to recovery is self-determination and self-sufficiency, so people get back their pride and purpose. But that’s a long, long process.
Windy
Sometimes it’s not very obvious how certain communities are disadvantaged. Especially when your entire life experience is different. It wasn’t until I moved to a country where I am a visible minority that I got a lot more insight into the many ways people discriminate. I feel my upbringing in Canada was blind. Now when I go back to Canada I see so much I never noticed before. Please, do as Nina suggested. Learn a little more. These sorts of problems aren’t just finished with one generation. Or two. Or three. Helping the the most disadvantaged portion of our society actually helps everyone. Including you. Including me.
20
Hanover Fiste
I saw Nina's comment above and I don't want to reply to her because she hates me and blocked me. But she said partially what I was thinking, and then went off the deep end. At lease she was polite to you, maybe because you're Canadian 🤣 Anyway, she is right that you can't base a judgement just on the few (2) things you saw. But then she used incarceration rates for evidence. I can't agree with that, because it's entirely possible their "look the other way" rates might also be higher. Is there a study on that? No, it would be impossible. But I just wanted to explore both sides of the coin here with my own thoughts on the matter. First, I wouldn't conclude anything based on a simple and small observation. But I would use that observation to call into "question" if any of those links provided even mean anything either. In the end, it's sad that racism exists, and people here in 2018 are still grouped and separated by some mythical basis called race.
10
Random ObsessionsAuthor
I had an extended conversation with another user about this through pm's I've been meaning to copy past two of my comments from that conversation but have been busy lately.
thelevel
Its aboot time that Canadians start treating other Canadians with respect ehh
12
Hanover Fiste
thelevel, sorry...
thelevel
Hanover Fiste, I was just poking fun at their ridiculous accent hahaha
Hanover Fiste
thelevel, sorry was a Canadian politeness joke
Hanover Fiste
thelevel, 🤣
Random ObsessionsAuthor
thelevel, then you've never been to Canada. I talk no different than the average American.
Hanover Fiste
Random Obsessions, sure y'all do. When you's guys talk it's probably a lot different, because we don't even talk the same, eh?
Random ObsessionsAuthor
Hanover Fiste, the Canadians you're poking at are those that live in the maritimes. Of which most places around here also poke fun at. From Manitoba to Alberta and most of BC it's an American accent. The only difference being that we do say "eh" a fair bit.
thelevel
Random Obsessions, tha-ats almo-ost co-orrect. It mietght even seem like we talk the same. But Americans hear something a bit different ehh
thelevel
Random Obsessions, for some reasons the ehh is what makes me laugh
Hanover Fiste
Random Obsessions, I'm from Michigan, and I say "eh" too. But I'm not poking at anyone, and if you look again, I combined some famous American accents. New England "yous guys" and southern y'all. My point was that every region has a way of speaking that's unique and fun.
Random ObsessionsAuthor
Hanover Fiste, ah. Like sarcasm, accents are difficult to convey over text.
Hanover Fiste
Random Obsessions, yep
Bunyodbek
Men tushunmaymanu, lekin ko'p yozvoribdi...
Write something...
Send
Earn SOL - a cryptocurrency used in Sola (ERC20 standard token). Sola is an iOS, Android and web application which is a mix of a media and community. Sola allows discovering new people and exciting content in a most simple, friendly and relaxed manner.