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Muslims around the world agree that Islam is the one true faith that leads to salvation. Many Muslims also say it is their religious duty to convert others to Islam.

Many Muslims say they know little about Christianity and other faiths. And few believe Islam and other religions have a lot in common. Even in countries where a substantial proportion of the population is non-Muslim, most Muslims report that all or most of their friends also are Muslim. And while interfaith meetings and classes of Muslims and Christians are fairly common in sub-Saharan Africa, few Muslims in other regions participate in such gatherings.

Few Muslims see conflict between religious groups as a very big national problem. In fact, most consider unemployment, crime and corruption as bigger national problems than religious conflict. Asked specifically about Christian-Muslim hostilities, few Muslims say hostilities are widespread.

Islam and Eternal Salvation

In 34 of the 38 countries where the question was asked, at least half of Muslims believe that Islam is the one true religion that can lead to eternal life in heaven.

Photo #1 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

In the majority of countries where the question was asked, Muslims who pray several times a day are more likely than those who pray less often to believe that Islam is the one true faith leading to eternal life. Differences by frequency of prayer consistently are large across the countries surveyed in Southern and Eastern Europe. For example, in Russia, Muslims who pray several times a day are 41 percentage points more likely than those who pray less often to believe Islam is the one true path to eternal salvation. Significant gaps on this question between those who pray several times a day and those who pray less often also are found in Kosovo (+34 percentage points), Albania (+28) and Bosnia-Herzegovina (+27).

Photo #2 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

Converting Others

In most countries surveyed, at least half of Muslims believe it is their religious duty to try to convert others to the Islamic faith. Only in Indonesia and some countries in Central Asia and Southern and Eastern Europe do a clear majority say Muslims are not obliged to proselytize.

Photo #3 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

The belief that Muslims are obligated to proselytize is particularly widespread in sub-Saharan Africa. Across the region, at least three-quarters of Muslims believe it is their religious duty to try to spread Islam to non-Muslims.

Religious Conflict as a Big National Problem

In only seven of the 38 countries where the question was asked do at least half of Muslims describe conflict between religious groups as a very big national problem, and in most cases worries about crime, unemployment, ethnic conflict and corruption far outweigh concerns about religious conflict. But a substantial minority of Muslims in a number of countries surveyed do see religious strife as a major issue.

Photo #4 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

Views of Muslim-Christian Hostilities

A minority of Muslims in 24 of the 26 countries where the question was asked say “most” or “many” Muslims and Christians are hostile toward one another. In Thailand, a small percentage of Muslims report hostilities between Muslims and Buddhists in their country.

Photo #5 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

Familiarity With Other Faiths

In only three of the 37 countries where the question was asked do at least half of Muslims say they know a great deal or some about Christian beliefs and practices. In Thailand, where Muslims were asked to rate their knowledge of Buddhism, less than one-in-five say they are familiar with the Buddhist faith.

Photo #6 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

Common Ground With Other Religions

At least half of Muslims in most countries surveyed say that Islam and Christianity are very different. In Thailand, most Muslims see Islam and Buddhism as very different.

Photo #7 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

Knowledge relateed to a Sense of Commonality

Muslims who say they know at least something about Christianity are considerably more likely than those with less knowledge to believe the two faiths have a lot in common. For example, in Tunisia, 68% of Muslims who say they know at least something about Christian beliefs and practices say Islam and Christianity share a lot in common. But among Tunisian Muslims who say they are less familiar with Christianity, about a quarter (27%) say the two religions share common ground. Large gaps are also seen in Iraq (+39), Kyrgyzstan (+34), Bosnia-Herzegovina (+30), Russia (+30) and Turkey (+30).

Photo #8 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

Relationships With People of Other Faiths

Relatively few Muslims count non-Muslims among their close friends. And in most countries surveyed, few are comfortable with the idea of their son or daughter marrying outside the faith.

Sub-Saharan Africa is the one region where the contact between Muslims and non-Muslims is often more frequent. For instance, substantial percentages Muslims in the region report that their families include both Muslims and Christians. In addition, Muslims in sub-Saharan African tend to participate in inter-faith classes and meetings at a higher rate than Muslims in other regions.

Close Friends

In every country where the question was asked, a large majority of Muslims say all or most of their close friends share their faith. The survey finds that even in countries with substantial non-Muslim populations, a large majority of Muslims say most, if not all, of their close friends share their faith. For example, in Lebanon, where non-Muslims make up nearly 40% of the population, 94% of Muslims describe their circle of close friends as exclusively or mostly Muslim.36 In Russia, where non-Muslims make up 90% of the population, 78% of Muslims say most or all of their close friends share their Islamic faith.37

Photo #9 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

Marrying Outside the Faith

In 22 countries outside sub-Saharan Africa, the survey asked Muslims how comfortable they would be with the idea of their son or daughter marrying a Christian. Overall, relatively few Muslims find the idea of inter-marriage acceptable.

Photo #10 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

Views on Interfaith Marriage and Families in Sub-Saharan Africa

In sub-Saharan Africa, Muslims were asked how comfortable they would be if a child of theirs, regardless of gender, someday married a Christian. Overall, few Muslims in the region say they would accept such a marriage.

Interfaith Meetings

In most regions, few Muslims say they attend interfaith meetings or classes. But in sub-Saharan Africa, substantial proportions in several countries say they attend such gatherings with Christians. Interfaith interactions are especially common in Mozambique, Uganda and Liberia, where more than half of Muslims say they engage in organized meetings with Christians.

Photo #11 from Magdeburg, Germany by 5̀øÑ͜ ̕0f Æ̨ ğłīťç̴H made on 2018-12-29 19:49 for Sola

For further explanation please follow the blue headline link. Thanks for not just upswiping, any opinion and insight is welcomed in the comments.

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