Sola
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Tarun
a year

Now I can't claim this piece knowledge to be my own, but it's definitely worth sharing here. Adjectives in the English language must be placed in a very particular order.

Specifically: opinion-size-age-shape- colour-origin-material-purpose-noun. So it's easy to imagine having a lovely little old rectangular green French silver whittling knife. But if you change that order you sound like a maniac

It's an odd thing that every English speaker uses this list, but almost none of us could write it out. And as size comes before color, green great dragons simply can't exist.

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Australia, Tweed Heads South
9 comments
Taro (太郎)
An interesting observation, and the exceptions in great literature, poetry and song prove the rule.
1
Keepvogel ❓
Hmm... Groene grote draak is weird in my native language (Dutch) too.
TarunAuthor
Keepvogal, It is quite the interesting phenomenon
rico
Never cared enough to learn about this pattern for adjectives. I always did what sounded best at the time.
Philo 0316
I had to learn that back in Korea while learning English. It's strange to think about, but at the same time it just sounds natural to follow the "rule."
rico
I let things like aliteration control the order.
TarunAuthor
rico, but it's alliteration then it's still going to be alliteration no matter the order
rico
Tarun, Perfect aliteration also accounts for syllables, creating a rhythmic delivery that eliminates the need for any rules.
Freistaat
Pro Creator
Very helpful!
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